Critical Section


Sunday,  12/29/13  10:47 PM

drawing hands (aka the C compiler)Great football today, what?  And a great day in general; I kayaked, sailed, brunched, and watched, with eating and drinking all through.  And saw Secret Life, a great movie.  Onward into an interesting week!

At right possibly my favorite work by M.C.Escher, "drawing hands", which I like to call "the C compiler", photographed from a nice present, an Escher calendar, given me by Meg's boyfriend Nico.  (thanks!)  I have been thinking about coding a lot, and this is a beautiful visual metaphor.

Life! - July-Sept, 1945Watching Walter Mitty one is reminded of the once-greatness of Life Magazine, vividly brought back by this post: The Greatest Magazine ever Published (July-Sept, 1945).  Incredible.  The greatest generation had the greatest content, long before computers, the internet, or iPads...

Paging Walter Mitty: 100-year-old photo negative discovered in the Antarctic.  Wonder if any of them were destined for Life :)

Excellent: the first 3D-printed organ (a liver) is expected in 2014.  It will be for research, not a human transplant, but wow!  And here I am still printing plastic gnomes for my mantel.

thinking about the boxThinking about the box: Undergrads reinvent the carboard shipping container.  Excellent.  I love the way it opens, how many times have you almost killed yourself doing this with a dull pocketknife?

Facebook is "dead and buried" to teens.  So be it.  It's alive and well in my world...  just yesterday used it to re-meet an old sailing  buddy from 40 years ago.

remote access - is it finally here?Russell Beattie wonders Is Remote Access finally here?  His answer: maybe.

Chromebooks success punches Microsoft in the gut.  Inflamatory headline writing aside, this is essentially true.  Dave Winer says I told you so.  I'm not as pessamistic about it as he is.

Data: 21% of all notebooks are Chromebooks.  The power of free.

You could see this coming from a mile away: the next problem with solar power: how to charge for it.  So public utilities have long complained about customer power usage and encouraged solar power as a way to reduce it, and even compensated people for their excess power.  Now that solar power is causing meaningful reductions, it's begun impacting revenue, and has become a problem.  All such issues are fundamentally economic, and should be left to markets, not government.

Russian thermonuclear weaponMost excellent cold war nostalgia: the Russian Museum of Nuclear Weapons.  Wow.  Good thing it turned out, the Russians loved their children too...

Finally: I (re)discovered a folder of old stuff intended to be blogged about, from a period when I wasn't actively blogging.  Yippee.  And so now I'll drip them out...  here's the first:

dance moves!Back to school!

 

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Correlation vs. Causality
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Unnatural Selection
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Aperio's Mission = Automating Pathology
On Blame
Try, or Try Not
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Moving Mount Fuji The Nest Rock 'n Roll
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In the Wet
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solving bongard problems
visiting Titan
unintelligent design
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second gear
On the Persistence of Bad Design...
Texas chili cookoff
the inflection point
almost famous design and stochastic debugging
may I take your order?
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how did I get here (Mt.Whitney)?
the Law of Significance
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Daniel Jacoby's photographs
in praise of paddle shifting
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shining a light
Father's Day (in pictures)
your cat for my car
discovering the third quadrant
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world population map
no joy in Baker
introducing eyesFinder